XT RODENSTOCK 50MM F/4 IN-DEPTH REVIEW

PhaseOne XT & Rodenstock HR 50mm

THE 35MM EQUIVALENT FOR FULL-FRAME MEDIUM FORMAT: PHASE ONE XT RODENSTOCK 50MM F/4 IN-DEPTH REVIEW!

With a FOV equivalent to 33.5mm, this lens is the tech camera, full-frame medium format version of a 35mm, a classic, versatile lens for photographers: see in this Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 in-depth review my thoughts about this lens!

Every photographer has their own idea about what a “normal” lens is. In 35mm full-frame terms, most photographers traditionally considered the 50mm “normal”, albeit slightly longer than the calculated normal for the format. In more recent years, I have seen more and more photographers gravitating towards a slightly wider normal instead, such as 35mm. As someone who generally loves wide-angle lenses, I am in the latter group. For me, 35mm is a good “normal”, while 55-60mm is a good portrait lens, almost a short tele.

The Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 covers an angle of view of about 66 degrees on a full-frame medium format sensor (84 degrees when fully shifted, which is way more than what the Phase One XT’s movements allow for). As mentioned above, this makes it roughly equivalent to a 35mm lens in 35mm full-frame terms; while in recent years I enjoyed using 28mm as well as 35mm, the latter is a classic focal length and one I always loved using throughout my career.

Before we start, let me remind you that, as always, this review is based on real use of the lens in the field, and while you’ll find controlled tests, you won’t find any charts or studio shots in it. As well, please keep in mind that all my reviews are made under the point of view of a Fine Art Landscape Photographer: if your genre of photography is different, my findings might not apply to you and your work.

Disclaimer: At the time of writing, I am a Phase One Ambassador. That said, I am a professional photographer looking for the best equipment for my work, I buy all my gear with my hard-earned cash, and I don’t get paid by anyone to write articles for my blog.

As mentioned in my Phase One XT Rodenstock 32mm f/4 review, when building my Phase One XT kit I debated about whether getting the Rodenstock 32mm or the Rodenstock 40mm; the same debate went on in my mind between the Rodenstock 40mm and the lens in this Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 in-depth review. After all, 28mm and 35mm are pretty close, and I love them both; in the end, I decided to go for the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4, which I thought would fit better in my kit as far as focal length spacing.

This article is the third of a series of four articles dedicated to Rodenstock lenses on the Phase One XT. Below, a list of all articles in this series:

PHASE ONE XT RODENSTOCK 23MM F/5.6 IN-DEPTH REVIEW
PHASE ONE XT RODENSTOCK 32MM F/4 IN-DEPTH REVIEW
PHASE ONE XT RODENSTOCK 90MM F/5.6 IN-DEPTH REVIEW (coming soon)

Let’s get started now and see in this Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 in-depth review if it delivers!

The Dolomites Photography Workshop

BUILD, SIZE AND WEIGHT
The Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is fairly compact for a full-frame medium format lens covering a 90mm image circle. The main physical difference between getting this lens in Phase One XT mount against getting it in Rodenstock Aperture Mount (or, if you can find it, in Copal 0 shutter), is in the protruding X-Shutter.

A leap forward from the Copal 0 shutters of old, the X-Shutter gives you full control of aperture and shutter speed directly from the IQ4 digital back in exchange for a weight penalty of about 200/250 gr (0,4/0,5 pound) against choosing the same lens in Copal 0 or Rodenstock Aperture Mount. I really enjoy having such full integration, and I am happy to carry a little extra weight in exchange for that.

In X-Shutter version, the lens barrel features just a focus ring, which Phase One calls “Ultra Fine Manual Focus”. The action of the ring itself is extremely smooth, and the focus throw is extra-long to ensure very precise focusing. The focus ring sits right on top of the Cambo-compatible lens mount, and two very useful finger tabs are available to help you rotate it.

Minimum focusing distance for the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is unmarked but taking the last marking at 0.7m as reference I estimate it to be around 0.65-0.67m.

Like all tech camera lenses, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is not weather-sealed. Since I often use my gear in bad weather conditions, I always carry a Think Tank Photo Emergency Camera Cover which works great in protecting both camera and lens from the elements, while allowing me to operate them normally under it.

Precise focal length of the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is 51.68mm. With its 116 x 107 x 90mm (4.57 x 4.21 x 3.54 in) size and 950 gr (2.09 lbs) weight, and with a filter thread of 67mm, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is smaller and lighter than lenses covering a similar FOV in the full-frame medium format arena, but it’s obviously larger and heavier than most lenses covering an equivalent FOV in the small medium format camp. Of course, for fairness it’s worth remembering that these don’t have to cover a 90mm image circle.

For reference, in the full-frame medium format arena the PhaseOne 45mm f/3.5 is 101 x 123mm, has a 95mm filter thread (you’ll need to use 150mm filters with it) and weighs 1220 gr; the Hasselblad HCD 50mm f/3.5 is 85 x 116mm, has a 77mm filter thread, and weighs 975 gr. In the small medium format camp, the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/3.5 is 77 x 75mm, has a 67mm filter thread and weighs 417 gr; the FujiFilm GF 45mm f/2.8 is 84 x 88mm, has a 62mm filter thread and weighs 490 gr; the Leica 45mm Elmarit-S f/2.8 is 88 x 136mm, has an 82mm filter thread and weighs 1030 gr.

Cinque Terre & Tuscany Photography Workshop

USE OF FILTERS
Thanks to the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4’s 67mm filter thread, I can use 100mm filters with it with no vignetting whatsoever even using the lens fully shifted.

After almost 5 years working with Formatt-Hitech filters as a Brand Ambassador & Featured Artist (09.2016-05.2021), I am now looking for new filters to help me create my Fine Art landscape photographs. I am currently testing various options, and will update you as soon as I’ll have found the best, highest quality solution for my work.

IN USE: FOCUSING AND DIAPHRAGM
Like all tech camera lenses, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is manual focus only. This is of no concern to me, since for my Fine Art landscape work what counts the most is focusing precision, more than having the convenience of autofocus. A very long focus throw, together with the Phase One IQ4’s powerful magnifying features, makes achieving precise focus extremely easy.

As mentioned above, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 comes equipped with Phase One’s revolutionary X-Shutter. The X-Shutter electronically controls both diaphragm and shutter; crucially, it allows for full integration with the Phase One IQ4 either directly – when using the lens with the Phase One XT – or via a cable if you use any other lens mount supporting X-Shutter. In particular, this means that your aperture and shutter speed can both be controlled via the IQ4’s touchscreen in all shooting modes supporting such controls, and that EXIF will automatically be populated with your shooting data. Using the lens with a Phase One XT, your shift data will also automatically be recorded on EXIF.

SHARPNESS AT INFINITY
Methodology: using my usual “real world” test scene, I manually focused the lens on the trees on the far ridge in the center of the frame, using the maximum focus area magnification for precise focus, with the lens wide open. I then prepared 900 x 600px, 100% crops of the center, the top left corner and the mid-right side of the frame at full-stop apertures ranging from wide open to f/16. My Phase One XT had Firmware 8.01.0 installed. Capture One Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 lens profile has been applied, and a LCC profile has been created and applied to eliminate vignetting and colour cast.

Let’s start looking at the full scene first, to see how much coverage a 66 degrees angle of view will give you in the real world. The red rectangles mark the locations of the crops (click on the image to enlarge):

Let’s now examine the crops in detail, starting with the center of the frame (click on the images to enlarge):

The Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 starts slightly softer wide open at f/4, sharpness dramatically increases stopping down one stop at f/5.6, and at f/8-f/11 the lens is razor-sharp. After f/16, diffraction visibly takes its toll. For work where center sharpness is critical, I’d definitely recommend using the lens at either f/8 or f/11: both apertures are equally and amazingly sharp.

Let’s now examine the mid-right side of the frame (click on the images to enlarge):

Behavior in the mid-right of the frame is very similar to what we saw in the center. Starting off slightly softer wide-open at f/4, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 dramatically improves at f/5.6 and became razor-sharp at f/8-f/11, both being the best apertures with this lens in this section of the frame. Starting at f/16, diffraction’s effects are clearly visible.

Finally, let’s check the top left corner (click on the images to enlarge):

In the top left corner, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 again behaves quite similarly to what we have seen so far. The lens is slightly softer wide-open, stopping down to f/5.6 improves things dramatically and the lens is at its best at f/8; stopping down further, sharpness holds at f/11, an aperture I’d still consider perfectly useable for critical work, while at f/16 diffraction starts to take its toll, as expected.

Normandy & Brittany Photography Workshop

SHARPNESS AT CLOSE FOCUSING DISTANCE AND BOKEH
To examine sharpness at very close focusing distance, as well as to see how the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 draws out-of-focus areas, I focused on the Phillips screw right under the mailbox’s red flag in the lower right corner of the frame. Together with the full frame image I included 900 x 600px, 100% crops taken at the point of focus, to check out sharpness, and near-center crops to see how the lens behaves in out-of-focus areas near infinity. Again, Capture One Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 lens profile has been applied, and a LCC profile has been created and applied to eliminate vignetting and colour cast.

Let’s see the full image first, again to see how wide a 66 degrees angle of view is in the real world, as well as to show you the locations of the crops (click on the image to enlarge):

Let’s now examine sharpness at the point of focus (click on the images to enlarge):

Focusing at minimum focusing distance and checking sharpness in the far corners is a real torture test for any lens. The Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 shows an amazing performance focused up close in the far lower corner of the frame, starting extremely sharp already wide-open and improving stopping down to become razor-sharp at f/8. Sharpness holds through f/11 and f/16, and after that diffraction starts softening the image again. Extremely impressive.

Let’s see now how the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 renders out-of-focus areas at far distances in the center of the frame (click on the images to enlarge):

When looking for OOF areas rendition, as always, we need remember that – while the lens has a FOV equivalent in 35mm full-frame terms to that of a 35mm lens – we are talking about a 50mm lens on a large full-frame medium format sensor. Therefore, we shouldn’t expect to see the same depth of field created by lenses covering an equivalent FOV on 35mm full-frame. If you need everything to be perfectly in focus all over the frame in near-far compositions with the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4, you’ll need to either use a camera with tilt, use hyperfocal distance or to carefully place your focus point in your frame. While not my idea of fun, focus staking might definitely come in handy with this lens.

Coming to bokeh, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 draws out-of-focus areas beautifully wide open; stopping down, the lens slowly and progressively gains sharpness with each stop, and while depth of field is never enough to bring far away objects in focus, the lens retains what I consider to be a beautiful rendition of OOF areas along the whole aperture range.

Death Valley Photography Workshop

SHIFT AND FULL SHIFT STITCH
As mentioned in previous Rodenstock lens reviews, the ability to shift is one of the main reasons to choose a tech camera for your landscape and architectural work. Shift is useful to straighten converging lines when pointing the camera off level, of course, but is also useful to create images via stitching that would cover a wider angle of view than what using the lens unshifted would provide.

The Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 features an image circle of 90mm, allowing for 16/13mm shift in either direction when used on a full-frame medium format sensor such as the IQ4’s. While the image circle is the same as the Phase One XT Rodenstock 32mm f/4’s, it is worth nothing that a stitched image created fully shifting the 32mm in all 4 directions shows some hard vignetting in the far corners (see XT RODENSTOCK 32MM F/4 IN-DEPTH REVIEW), whereas a stitched image created fully shifting the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 in the same way results in a fully useable image, without any vignetting whatsoever.

To visually show you what you can expect when fully stitching the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4, I created two composite images, one at infinity and one at close focusing distance, stitching four single images taken with the back fully shifted in all directions (12/12mm, -12/12mm, 12/-12mm, and -12/-12mm). I’ll use these images here both to show you all the most common image ratio crops together with their resulting resolutions in Mp, and to check on the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4’s sharpness when shifted.

Let’s start having a look at the full image at infinity with crop overlays (click on the image to enlarge):

Below you’ll find a list of the resolution resulting from stitching & cropping against the resolution you’d get cropping just a single shot, for each image ratio, in descending order of “gain”. Stitched images on the left side, cropped single files on the right side:

5:4 | 20460 x 16368px = 335 Mp versus 13318 x 10652px = 141 Mp (+194 Mp)
1:1 | 16933 x 16933px = 287 Mp versus 10652 x 10652px = 113 Mp (+174 Mp)
4:3 | 20460 x 15345px = 314 Mp versus 14204 x 10652px = 151 Mp (+163 Mp)
3:2 | 20460 x 13640px = 279 Mp versus 14204 x 9470px = 134 Mp (+145 Mp)
16:9 | 20460 x 11509px = 235 Mp versus 14204 x 7990px = 113 Mp (+122 Mp)

As you can see, thanks to the ability of using the full stitched areas without having to crop to avoid vignetting as we had to do with the 23mm and 32mm, the increase in resolution and in coverage gained by stitching four fully-shifted images vs cropping a single shot is dramatically evident regardless of the image ratio you plan on using. Gain in pixel count is over 100% at all image ratios except for 3:2, where you gain 96% more pixel, and for 16:9, where you still gain a very respectable 80% extra pixel.

In particular, the gain in FOV coverage obtained when stitching the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is such that the resulting 4:3 image crop covers almost exactly the same FOV covered by a 32mm’s single shot native 4:3 image. This makes carrying the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 and using it fully stitched a very interesting alternative to carrying the 32mm, for those situations where stitching is possible and when saving weight and bulk in your bag is paramount, such as for very long hikes.

To show you in practice how close a full stitched image created with the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 will take you to an image created with the Phase One XT Rodenstock 32mm f/4, I prepared a 4:3 maximum useable crop of the fully stitched 50mm image, presented here side-by-side with a full image created with the 32mm. Of course, both photos have been shot with the tripod in the exact same place, on the same day and at minutes difference between one other (click on the images to enlarge):

As you can see, the difference in coverage between using the Phase One XT Rodenstock 32mm f/4 unstitched and the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 fully stitched is extremely minimal. As well, we have to keep in mind that stitching the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 will give you much more resolution, offering over twice the pixel count against a single 32mm image (314 Mp versus 151). As mentioned in my 32mm review, however, please keep in mind that replacing the 32mm with stitching the 50mm is not always possible. Let me just give you a couple of examples:

1. Moving objects. If you have moving objects in your frame, such as cars, and you do even moderately short exposures, their position won’t necessarily match when you’ll try and stitch images taken even a few seconds apart.
2. If you plan on doing long exposures of moving clouds in the order of minutes, as I often do, stitching might become problematic if not overall impossible – the clouds will have moved enough between the two shots that their shapes won’t match when you try and stitch them.

That said, for those shooting situations where it’s feasible to do so, stitching the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 rather than carrying the 32mm is definitely a possibility to keep in mind.

Iceland Photography Workshop

SHIFTED SHARPNESS
More than doubling the pixel count of our images and gaining extra FOV coverage is great, as is the possibility to leave the 32mm at home and cover that focal length with stitched Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 photos instead. However, it wouldn’t make sense to do so if the resulting images weren’t up to standard, quality-wise. Creating samples to check sharpness for every shifted position at every aperture would make the review impracticably huge, and it would be a bit redundant as well. To give you an idea about how the lens behaves when stitched, I decided to add samples taken at three different positions at infinity and one at close distance. These samples have been shot at f/11, Capture One’s Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 lens profile has been applied, and a LCC profile has been created and applied to eliminate vignetting and colour cast from each of the single images before stitching them.

Let’s see the full images first, both at infinity and close focused, to show you the locations of the crops (click on the images to enlarge):

Let’s now examine the crops, starting with the three infinity ones followed by the close focused one (click on the images to enlarge):

Starting with the infinity crops, as you can see, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is extremely sharp in the center at f/11, and while slightly less sharp in both far corners – with the lens fully shifted in opposite directions – the samples are still perfectly useable for critical of work.

Coming to the close focus crop, even when fully shifted the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 repeated the impressive performance we saw with the lens unshifted, returning an impressive amount of detail.

Glencoe & Isle of Skye Photography Workshop

SHARPNESS CONCLUSIONS
When examining sharpness for tech camera systems such as the Phase One XT, it’s worth keeping in mind that a lens such as the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 features a large image circle of 90mm, and it must resolve a pixel size of 3,76 micron all over that image circle. To give you an idea, 50 Mp small medium format sensors are both smaller at 44 x 33mm and have a larger pixel size of 5,3 micron. Currently, the only other sensors featuring a pixel size of 3,76 micron are 100 Mp small medium format and 61 Mp 35mm full-frame sensors, but their sizes are respectively just 44 x 33mm and 24 x 36mm, and since they don’t offer shift, their lenses only need to cover an image circle of 55mm and 43mm respectively. Having to cover such a large image area while providing such a high level of resolving power over the whole frame makes creating a lens such as the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 an optical tour-de-force.

The Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 does an impressive job, as far as sharpness all over the frame goes. The lens’ image plane looks effectively flat, returning very similar results in different areas of the image. Focused at infinity, the lens is sharp wide open, extremely sharp at f/5.6 and razor sharp all over the frame at f/8 and f/11; at f/16 and stopping further down, diffraction starts affecting the results.

At close focusing distances and focused in the far corners, the lens is very sharp wide-open, at f/5.6 it’s already impressive and at f/8-f/16 is just razor sharp. After f/16, diffraction takes its toll.

If interested, you’ll find Rodenstock own lens data and MFT charts here: LENSES FOR DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

During my first real-world outing, I found the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4’s performance to match what I have seen in my controlled test, and I can easily say that the lens is a truly amazing performer in terms of sharpness all over the frame. Impressive.

LCC OR NOT LCC: VIGNETTE, COLOUR CAST AND COLOUR RENDITION
While not as pronounced as lenses covering a wider FOV, such as the 32mm and 23mm, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 shows a hint of soft vignette all along the aperture range. While I haven’t measured it scientifically, it feels like vignetting is between half and one stop.

This is a very small amount of vignette, and many wouldn’t be bothered by it; however, if you plan on removing it or at least on reducing its amount, it’s something that can easily be done creating an LCC profile using the appropriate white target provided by Phase One with the XT (see CREATING A LCC REFERENCE IMAGE for a good tutorial about it). It is worth nothing how, thanks to the new IQ4’s sensor, using such a software-based solution to fix vignette won’t introduce any penalty in terms of image quality degradations of sort.

While colour cast is a traditional issue with tech camera wide-angle lenses, happily the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 has just a faint hint of it, pretty much irrelevant in real world use. If you want to remove it, the same LCC profile I recommended above to fix vignetting will do that with a click.

To show you how the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 behaves in terms of vignette & colour cast I created two sets of images taken respectively wide-open at f/4 and at f/11. I then prepared them with and without applying an LCC profile for you to gauge the differences (click on the images to enlarge):

As you can see, vignetting is very minor and colour cast nearly absent. In any case, creating a LCC profile completely fixes both.

As expected by such a high-quality lens, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 outputs images with beautiful and smooth colours, and most importantly – paired with the IQ4’s 16bit files – with really beautiful tonal transition. What counts the most for me personally is that the images are very neutral, they don’t “push” you in any direction when post-processing them thus leaving me with all the room for maneuver I need for my work.

DISTORTION
As always, to check for distortion I photographed my uninspiring garage door, which with its straight metal lines provides me with a perfect test scene for such a test. For your convenience, to help you check distortion easier I slightly increased contrast, added straight red lines in PP, turned the image horizontal and cut the frame in two, showing you just the top half of the frame. Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4’s profile has been applied in Capture One. Let’s see the results (click on the image to enlarge):

As you can see, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 with its lens profile applied is extremely well controlled for distortion: straight lines stay perfectly straight all over the frame.

FLARE AND CHROMATIC ABERRATIONS
Since I have a filter holder on the lens for 99% of my work, for years I haven’t used – or even carried – a lens hood. Since I want my reviews to mimic my working conditions as closely as possible, during my tests I never use a lens hood as well. To make this as much of a torture test as possible, in the image below I included the sun in the frame, keeping it close to the image’s corner. As well, I included a crop of the area surrounding the sun to check both for contrast loss and for chromatic aberrations (click on the images to enlarge):

As most Rodenstock lenses, especially wide-angles, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is prone to flaring. In the images above you can clearly see a slight loss of contrast in the leaves around the sun; more, variously coloured ghost images appears in the frame, their shapes clearly showing the 5-bladed diaphragm of the X-Shutter. On the other hand, while a magenta cast is present in the ghost images, the lens shows no CA of any kind, even in high-contrast areas. Contrast loss is visible around the sun; however, that is something easily fixed in post-processing.

Since I don’t even carry lens hoods with me when I work, as mentioned above, to prevent my lenses from flaring I always carry with me a foldable, reflector-like grey card instead. It’s small, light, works perfectly as a “sun blocker” in eliminating flare and doesn’t prevent me from using filters when I need to do so.

CONCLUSIONS
With a FOV equivalent to 33.5mm, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is the full-frame medium format version of a 35mm lens in 35mm full-frame terms, covering a classic focal length and a very useful one for landscape and architectural photography. Its 90mm image circle allows for 16/13mm of shift, which in turn translates in the possibility create fully stitched images on the Phase One XT without any vignetting whatsoever.

Featuring the revolutionary X-Shutter, the lens is fully integrated with the Phase One XT. Such integration allows for full control of the lens from the IQ4 and fully automatic EXIF support, including shift data. This makes the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 a joy to use, both in the field and out of the field, for a streamlined and efficient workflow that I find light years better than using tech camera lenses without X-Shutter.

Under a technical point of view, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 is a truly impressive lens. Razor sharp all over the frame at f/8-f/11, paired with the Phase One IQ4 the lens outputs images with an unbelievable level of detail. More, the lens features no distortion and no chromatic aberration, extremely low (and artistically pleasant) vignette and effectively no colour cast. Flare is pronounced when shooting into the sun, but while annoying this is something easily fixed by shielding the lens’ front element. A lens hood would probably do, but since I always have a filter holder on all my lenses, I find using a hand-held solution more efficient.

Judging the way a lens draws, artistically, is of course a very personal matter. Personally, I find the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 to be a beautiful lens to use. Not only it creates images with an astounding level of detail, but its rendition of out-of-focus areas is beautiful and extremely pleasing to my eyes.

The Isle Of Arran Photography Workshop

A MUST-HAVE LENS? THOUGHTS ON THE FOCAL LENGTH
We all choose or kit according to both our aesthetics and to the subject matter we photograph. Everyone has different requirements, different ideas and, therefore, chooses different focal lengths for their work. As I always say, there aren’t universally right or wrong choices, just different tools working for different photographers.

As a keen wide-angle user, speaking in 35mm full-frame terms I consider 35mm closer to my idea of “normal” than 50mm. Together with the 23mm and 32mm, the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 makes for a 15mm – 21mm – 35mm FOV equivalent wide-angle setup that perfectly, and beautifully, covers all my needs.

If you aren’t into ultra-wide angles, then a kit with the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 and the 32mm, covering 21mm and 35mm FOV equivalent, would be a perfect solution. If you love wide-angles but aren’t as into long exposures as I am, and you’d be OK stitching the 50mm to cover the angle of view of the 32mm, then a two-lens setup consisting of the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 with the 23mm would fit the bill. On the other hand, if you love long exposures but don’t need three options on the wide-angle and you don’t need the full integration with the Phase One XT that I enjoy, then the Rodenstock 40mm f/4 with a X-Shutter (or even in Rodenstock Aperture Mount) would be an alternative I’d definitely consider, either paired with the 23mm or on its own.

So, should you get the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4? Well, as always it depends on your preferences in terms of focal lengths. If you love to have a 35mm FOV equivalent option in your kit, then this lens is a must have. As with all Rodenstock lenses, if you plan on using them with an IQ4 I would heavily recommend you get the lens in X-Shutter for the full integration it provides, and even more so when used on the Phase One XT.

In conclusion, I was truly impressed by the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4, it’s a really strong performer, it draws beautifully and if you need this focal length on a tech camera, I wouldn’t think twice about getting it. Highly recommended.

As always, the photographs are what counts the most. Due to Covid-19, I haven’t had a chance to use this lens intensively yet; I will post samples taken with the Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 as I’ll develop them.

Dorset Jurassic Coast Photography Workshop

Thanks for reading this Phase One XT Rodenstock 50mm f/4 in-depth review, I hope you enjoyed it! Why don’t you share it with your friends, or drop me a comment to let me know how you feel about this?

Have a great day, and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE TO MY NEWSLETTER!

Enjoying the blog? Support us with a PayPal donation:

SHARE THIS PAGE ON:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on google
Share on pinterest
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

JOIN THE DISCUSSION

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Subscribe to my newsletter
not to miss future articles!

let's develop photography together